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Parliamentary elections in Iceland

PirateTimes
 
Parliamentary elections in Iceland

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On Saturday the 28th  October 2017, general parliamentary elections were held in Iceland. These elections came just a year after the last ones because the ruling government collapsed in September after one of the third ruling parties left the coalition citing a scandal involving the Prime Minister’s father.

The Icelandic Pirate Party (PPIS) achieved a result of 9.2% earning them 6 seats in parliament, out of a total of 63. This is a decrease of 5.3% and results in a loss of 4 seats. It is, however, the third consecutive national election in which PPIS managed to get into parliament.

These were the first national election for PPIS without the well know Birgitta Jónsdóttir as the top candidate. She decided not to participate in this elections to focus on other things she feel are important. Also, Ásta Guðrún Helgadóttir decided not to run again; this being in line with the Icelandic Pirates idea that members of parliament should not stay in office for too long.

The sheer number of parties elected to the new parliament (8) means building a stable coalition will be difficult and there could well be another round of elections before the term of government is fully served.

The Pirates elected to the new AlÞingi are:

Halldóra Mogensen

Helgi Hrafn Gunnarsson

Björn Leví Gunnarsson

Þórhildur Sunna Ævarsdóttir

Smári McCarty

Jón Þór Ólafsson

Twitter quotes
Today is my last day as a parliamentarian. So thankful for the trust and the support in the role as a poetician…. https://t.co/DHpVaQHSa5

— BirgittⒶ Jónsdóttir (@birgittaj) October 28, 2017

And thus begins my second term as an elected representative of the Icelandic people.

— Smári McCarthy (@smarimc) October 29, 2017

Well this is by far the weirdest election result I’ve seen, I can’t imagine this parliament finishing a term #kosningar

— Arnaldur Sigurðarson (@Arnaldtor) October 29, 2017


Featured Image: CC-BY PPIS

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 Iceland  election  Birgitta Jónsdóttir  Election  PPIS  Pirate Party
Breakthrough for Czech Pirates

PirateTimes
 
Breakthrough for Czech Pirates

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In the national elections this past weekend the Czech Pirates (PPCZ) achieved great success and ended up as the third largest party in their parliament.

The Czech Republic is a country of 10 million people in the heart of Europe and they are also members of the European Union. Being the second Pirate Party, after Iceland, to get a seat in a national assembly is a very important step forward for the global Pirate movement.

They got 10,76% (+8.13%) of the votes, surpassing their own goal of 10%. From 0 seats in the national parliament they now have 22 persons elected. Ivan Bartos, the top candidate for PPCZ, became the second most popular politician.

The results of the Czech Pirates were especially good in the countries capital. In certain city districts they became the largest party with results of up to 18% of the votes.

The Czech Pirates have at this time declined to enter into coalition talks with the overall winners (ANO 2011) and expect to become the leaders of the opposition.

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 ivan bartos  Election  results  PPCZ  national
A new milestone for the international Pirate movement looms

PirateTimes
 
A new milestone for the international Pirate movement looms

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Today and Tomorrow, the Pirates in the Czech Republic (PPCZ) are competing in their national elections.

PPCZ launched their campaign on 22 May 2017 with the hope of reaching 10% of the votes. Their campaign is based on two main agenda points:
  • Radical tax reforms
  • Changes to government administration
As many countries the Czech Republic has a 5% electoral threshold to enter Parliament. The Pirates have managed to reach up to as high as 7.6% in recent polls. Their chances of getting into their national parliament are quite good. If they manage to enter their national parliament they will be the second Pirate Party to achieve this goal after Iceland.

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 PPCZ  national  Czech Republic  Election
PPIS Ranked Third But Won The Elections In Effect

PirateTimes
 
PPIS Ranked Third But Won The Elections In Effect

Bild/Foto
Although Pirate Party of Iceland (PP-IS) finally ranked third in the number of votes, it gained so much more publicity than any other party and having an open possibility to be part of the next government, it can be considered to have won the elections practically!

After the recent failure of Berlin Pirates in September, who lost 15 seats in the parliament of Berlin, the tripling of the number of seats held by PP-IS was what the Pirate movement needed to recover morale. In only three and a half years since its entering parliament, PP-IS has increased its share of the vote from 5,1% to 14,98%. The Pirates now have 10 MP’s, seven more than 2013 and now have representatives from all the regions of the country. PP-IS still remains the only Pirate party that has representatives in a national parliament. They are valid players at the table of power and under certain circumstances could to participate in the next government.

Besides this great electoral success, the most important thing for the Pirate movement is the great mobilization, support and solidarity shown by Pirates globally. Since April, when it became clear that there will be snap elections in Iceland, Pirates from many parties declared themselves willing  to help in any way they could with the election campaign. A few days prior the election date many Pirates traveled to Iceland to experience this historic moment.

On election day and especially the night, many parties were organized throughout the world to watch the results. In cities such as Helsinki, Stockholm, Amsterdam, Delft, Groningen, Dusseldorf, Berlin, London (Canada) and in Luxembourg Pirates celebrated.

Of course the main party was in Reykjavik where Rick Falkvinge, the founder of the Pirate movement, Julia Reda, Pirate MEP, Icelandic pirates and many other pirates from Sweden, Germany, New Zealand, Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, Italy created a cheering atmosphere that was live streamed.

See more pictures from the events at piratesforiceland.party

The media were gripped by frenzy about the Pirate movement

There were countless references in the media about PP-IS even when another party was leading in the polls! It is striking how the international mainstream media informed their readers who were hungry to read more about the Pirate party. Although the Pirates were surpassed in the number of votes it is the only party that readers will remember a long time after the event!

In the long term, all that publicity will have an great impact in the electoral influence of the Pirate parties in countries, where already Pirate parties exist and will inspire people to create Pirate parties in countries where there are none.

There were reports in countries such as Finland, Greece, Serbia, Spain, New Zealand, Netherlands, Slovenia, Russia, Japan, France, Portugal, of course in Sweden, the birthplace of the Pirate movement, with intense interest. In Israel, the Israeli left newspaper featured it and a Pirate was invited to talk about the elections on Israeli TV! For a complete world press coverage take a look at scoop.it

Τhe key features of the elections

1) No party has a simple majority needed to form a government because none of them received needed  32 seats out of 63 in the Althingi (Icelandic Parliament). Thus all elected parties will have to negotiate. PP-IS announced , two days before the election, the results of negotiations with theLeft – Green Movement, Bright Future and the Social Democratic Alliance (now representing 27 seats). The Independence and Progressive Parties gathered 29 seats but can’t form a majority government. Viðreisn (Reform) which is a new party, gained 7 seats and is the “kingmaker” of the election. The leader of Reform has stated that his party will not co-operate with the outgoing government.

The final results are:

Independence Party (54,990) 29.00% 21 seats

Left-Green Movement (30,166) 15.91% 10 seats

Pirate Party (27,449) 14.48% 10 seats

Progressive Party (21,791) 11.49% 8 seats

Reform (19,870) 10.48% 7 seats

Bright Future (13,578) 7.16% 4 seats

Social Democratic Alliance (10,893) 5.74% 3 seats

People’s Party (6,707) 3.54 % No seats

Dawn (3,275) 1.7% No seats

People’s Front of Iceland (575) 0.30% No seats

Icelandic National Front (303) 0.16% No seats

Humanist Party (33) 0.02% No seats

Invalid/blank votes 5,574

Total 195,204

Registered voters 246,515 Turnout 79.19%

2) The resounding failure of the polls to accurately portray the voting intention of Icelanders. Not one poll predicted the results of the elections. They forecast that the Independence Party would rank in the 1st place but no poll said that the Pirates would finally be third in votes. Instead all polls anticipated they would surely be second.

3) 48% of the Althingi consisted of women MPs making it the most gender equal parliament ever! The Icelandic parliament has 30 women MPs, a unique record in the history of Iceland and the world’s parliamentary history. The MP’s of PP-IS are equal 5 men and 5 women!

4) The turnout of the voters was low for Icelandic standards. It was below 80% . Itcould have been even higher if the elections were held in April, when the weather in Iceland is better.

The political landscape after the elections

The day after the elections four Pirate MPs, Birgitta Jónsdóttir, Smári McCarthy, Björn Leví Gunnarsson, Halldóra Mogensen, gave a press conference commenting on the outcome of the elections and what the Pirate Party is going to do. According to the them the landscape after the elections is complicated not only in the political level but in practicality, because it’s the first time that seven parties have representatives in the parliament.

“It’s a very tight issue, we have to proceed with a lot of negotiations and compromise but it’s very interesting times for democracy. Pirates are open to compromise but not with the parties that were in the government. We need a long term vision, where we’re going as a society and that’s something that the Pirate Party has been working on for years. We focus on inspiring the general public to participate and co-create our society, on empowering people to be part of the change and we work to give people easy ways to participate”, pirates said among others.

PPIS also reported on its website:

“…Icelandic Pirates are overjoyed to have now secured a Pirate representative to Alþingi from every single one of Iceland’s six electorate districts, with first-time representatives in North West, North East and South districts, and additional four representatives being elected in the capital districts Reykjavik South, Reykjavik North and South West (Kópavogur, Garðabær, Hafnarfjörður, Seltjarnarnes, Mosfellsbær). The Pirate Party of Iceland would like to thank the scores of international Pirates that have visited us here in Iceland from thirteen different countries, including Sweden, Australia, Slovenia, Germany, USA and Canada for their help and wonderful company and thanks to the people that have sent us countless greetings and yarrr’s from all over the world…”

Meet the 10 Pirate MP’s of PP-IS

PP-IS elected Pirate MP’s in all the regions of Iceland as it follows:

Reykjavik North (3)

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Birgitta Jónsdóttir is a poetician and one of the founders of the Pirate Party in Iceland. She has been an MP for both the “Movement” and PP-IS. Birgitta has worked in diverse functions, including office administrative and work, organization of artistic events of various kinds, layout of books, graphics, translation, journalism, writing, etc. Birgitta has a keen interest in the working procedures of the Parliament and its responsibility. She herself says: “I am interested in setting up a Standing Committee of Parliament for the cross-party consensus, having long-term goals, such as e.g. the restoration of health care, changes in education in the spirit of Finnish, pensions, sustainability and electrical / methane cars fuel.”

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Björn Leví Gunnarsson reelected MP. He gave great emphasis on equal weighting of votes nationwide. He became a software specialist in educational institutions after he obtained his master’s degree in the United States but he held various jobs, including teaching in elementary school. “Society expects more responsibility, more information, more cooperation. The system will not be fair unless people become responsible. The system will not be honest unless everyone has access to information. The system will not be human but with more cooperation.”

Bild/Foto

Halldóra Mogensen has been a

parliamentrydeputy and she has, among others, submitted a resolution on unconditional basic income. A profound sense of justice and a desire to benefit her community benefit have been the dominant driving forces in her life. “My key issue is about to eliminate poverty and provide equal opportunities for the individual and be truly free. It concerns me to come to the necessary constitutional changes and update our systems in line with the opportunities that technological advances offer”

Reykjavik South (2)

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Ásta Guðrún Helgadóttir 26 years old and a reelected MP. In the Parliament, she has undertaken a variety of issues in many fields and made an impact on the ownership of Landsbanki. Moreover, she has kept track of the copyright for the parliamentary group and has been working closely with pirate MEP Julia Reda. In recent years, she has devoted herself to the work related in one way or another to democracy, freedom of speech and changes in the constitution to reflect the democratic society of the 21st century better. Asta is a historian by training.

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Gunnar Hrafn Jónsson 35 years has worked as a journalist. He has  a BSc in Social Sciences and lived in UK and Netherlands, China, Germany and Iceland. After moving home in 2006 he was a journalist with the “Reykjavik Grapevine” and then a reporter on “RUV“. He has a 3 years old daughter and he is a real bun but overcame his stand-up comedy contest funniest man in Iceland in 2012

Southwest (2)

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Jón Þór Ólafsson Former pirate MP, he made headlines when he left the parliament and returned to work on asphalt. He is married and has two children. During this term of office he got busy, among others, with health care, the EU membership application, fishing quotas and debt issues. He believes it is urgent to create a powerful competitive environment in Iceland, rebuild the health system and improve the lot of the elderly and disabled. “I became member of  the Pirats when I realized that the Pirate Party stands for human rights protection and democratic reforms of our time.”

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Þórhildur Sunna Ævarsdóttir She has graduated from the University of Utrecht in international and human rights law. Her key issues concerning the rights of those who are disadvantaged in society, the adoption of a new constitution and the restoration of health care. She lives in Mosfellsbær. “Human rights of minorities and marginalized individuals are my particular areas of interest. In my work I concentrate on the rights of refugees, people with disabilities, prisoners and drug users, along with the rights of people with mental disorders and psychiatric illness.”

Northwest (1)

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Eva Pandora Baldursdóttir Born in Sauðárkrókur in 1990, has a Bachelor degree in Business Administration from the University of Iceland, completed one year in MA in Cultural Management at the University of Bifrost and has an MPA degree in public administration at the University of Iceland. She registered with the Progressive Party from the age of 16 when she started to get interested in politics but when she met the Pirate Party a few months before the last parliamentary elections she saw immediately that the strategy and values of the Pirates matched hers. Since then, her interest in politics grown and the issues that remain in focus with her are health, education, housing, corruption, agriculture and equality.

Northeast (1)

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Einar Aðalsteinn Brynjólfsson He has mostly been teaching, of which the last seven years in High School. Einar has worked in various jobs, in fishing, the programming of radio stations, proofreading and guidance.

South (1)

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Smári McCarthy was the Technical Director of Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project  which was involved in the Panama Papers. In recent years he mainly worked in freedom of information and democracy projects. Smári has developed various open source software, including the Wasa2il which was nominated for the Prix Ars Electronica awards in 2013. He writes a lot, among other things, for journals such as “Arc” and “New Internationalist”, but has also written essays for Bergeron’s Children, Mediando la Democracia, The End of Artificial Scarcity.

All images from piratar.is and piratar.island (facebook) CC BY-SA

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 PPIS  Iceland  elections  Pirate History  Election
PPIS Ranked Third But Won The Elections In Effect

PirateTimes
 
PPIS Ranked Third But Won The Elections In Effect

Bild/Foto
Although Pirate Party of Iceland (PPIS) finally ranked third in the number of votes, it gained much more publicity than any other party. PPIS has a possibility to be part of the next government, it can be considered the largest winner of these elections.

After the recent failure of Berlin Pirates in September (they lost 15 seats in the parliament of Berlin) the tripling of the number of seats held by PPIS was what the Pirate movement needed to recover morale. In only three and a half years since entering parliament, PPIS has increased its share of the vote from 5,1% to 14,98%. The Pirates now have 10 MP’s, seven more than 2013 and now have representatives from all the regions of the country. PPIS still remains the only Pirate party that has representatives in a national parliament. They are valid players at the table of power and under certain circumstances they could even participate in the next government.

Besides the great electoral success, the most important feat for the Pirate movement is the great mobilization, support and solidarity shown by Pirates globally. Since April, when it became clear that there will be snap elections in Iceland, Pirates from many parties declared themselves willing  to help in any way they could with the election campaign. A few days prior to the election date many Pirates traveled to Iceland to experience this historic moment.

On election day and especially during the night, many parties were organized throughout the world to watch the results. Pirates celebrated in cities such as Helsinki, Stockholm, Amsterdam, Delft, Groningen, Dusseldorf, Berlin, London (Canada) and Luxembourg.

Of course the main party was in Reykjavik where Rick Falkvinge, the founder of the Pirate movement, Julia Reda, Pirate MEP, Icelandic pirates and many other pirates from Sweden, Germany, New Zealand, Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain and Italy created a cheering atmosphere that was live streamed.

See more pictures from the events at piratesforiceland.party

The media was gripped by frenzy about the Pirate movement
There were countless references in the media about PPIS, even when another party was leading in the polls. It is striking how the international mainstream media informed their readers who were hungry to read more about the Pirate Party. Although the Pirates were surpassed in the number of votes it is the only party that readers will remember a long time after the event!

In the long term, all the publicity will have a great impact in the electoral influence of the Pirate Parties in countries, where Pirate Parties already exist and will also inspire people to create Pirate Parties in countries where there are none.

There were reports in countries such as Finland, Greece, Serbia, Spain, New Zealand, Netherlands, Slovenia, Russia, Japan, France, Portugal and of course intense interest in Sweden (the birthplace of the Pirate movement). In Israel, the Israeli newspaper featured it and a Pirate was invited to talk about the elections on Israeli TV. For a complete world press coverage take a look at scoop.it

The final results
Invalid/blank votes 5,574    //  Total 195,204   // Registered voters 246,515   //   Turnout 79.19%

Independence Party (54,990) 29.00% 21 seats
Left-Green Movement (30,166) 15.91% 10 seats
Pirate Party (27,449) 14.48% 10 seats
Progressive Party (21,791) 11.49% 8 seats
Reform (19,870) 10.48% 7 seats
Bright Future (13,578) 7.16% 4 seats
Social Democratic Alliance (10,893) 5.74% 3 seats
People’s Party (6,707) 3.54 % No seats
Dawn (3,275) 1.7% No seats
People’s Front of Iceland (575) 0.30% No seats
Icelandic National Front (303) 0.16% No seats
Humanist Party (33) 0.02% No seats

Key features of the elections
1) No party has the simple majority needed to form a government because none of them received the needed 32 out of 63 seats in the Althingi (Icelandic Parliament). Thus all elected parties will have to negotiate. PPIS announced, two days before the election, the results of negotiations with the Left-Green Movement, Bright Future and the Social Democratic Alliance (totaling 27 seats between the 4 parties). The Independence and Progressive Party (the old government coalition) gathered 29 seats and thus can’t form a majority government. Viðreisn (Reform), which is a new party, gained 7 seats and is the “kingmaker” of the election. The leader of Reform has stated that his party will not co-operate with the outgoing government.

2) The resounding failure of the polls to accurately portray the voting intention of Icelanders. Not one poll predicted the results of the elections. They forecast that the Independence Party would rank in 1st place but no poll said that the Pirates would finally be third in votes. Instead all polls anticipated they would surely be second.

3) 48% of the Althingi consisted of women MPs making it the most gender equal parliament ever. The Icelandic parliament has 30/63 women MPs, a unique record in the history of Iceland and the world’s parliamentary history. The MPs of PPIS are equal with five men and five women.

4) The turnout of the voters was low for Icelandic standards. It was below 80% . It could have been even higher if the elections were held in April, when the weather in Iceland is better.

The political landscape after the elections
The day after the elections four Pirate MPs (Birgitta Jónsdóttir, Smári McCarthy, Björn Leví Gunnarsson and Halldóra Mogensen) gave a press conference commenting on the outcome of the elections and what the Pirate Party will do. According to the them the landscape after the elections is complicated, not only in the political level but also in the practical level, because it’s the first time that seven parties have representatives in the parliament.
“It’s a very tight issue, we have to proceed with a lot of negotiations and compromise, but it’s very interesting times for democracy. Pirates are open to compromise but not with the parties that were in the government. We need a long term vision, where we’re going as a society and that’s something that the Pirate Party has been working on for years. We focus on inspiring the general public to participate and co-create our society, on empowering people to be part of the change and we work to give people easy ways to participate”, pirates said among others.

PPIS also reported on its website:
“…Icelandic Pirates are overjoyed to have now secured a Pirate representative to Alþingi from every single one of Iceland’s six electorate districts, with first-time representatives in North West, North East and South districts, and additional four representatives being elected in the capital districts Reykjavik South, Reykjavik North and South West (Kópavogur, Garðabær, Hafnarfjörður, Seltjarnarnes, Mosfellsbær). The Pirate Party of Iceland would like to thank the scores of international Pirates that have visited us here in Iceland from thirteen different countries (including Sweden, Australia, Slovenia, Germany, USA and Canada) for their help and wonderful company and thanks to the people that have sent us countless greetings and YAAAR’s from all over the world…”


Meet the 10 Pirate MPs of PPIS
PPIS elected Pirate MPs in all the regions of Iceland

Reykjavik North (3)
Bild/Foto

Birgitta Jónsdóttir is one of the re-elected MPs. She is a “poetician” (poet/politician) and one of the founders of the Pirate Party in Iceland. She has been an MP for both the “Movement” and PPIS. Birgitta has worked in diverse functions, including office administrative and work, organization of artistic events of various kinds, layout of books, graphics, translation, journalism, writing, etc. Birgitta has a keen interest in the working procedures of the Parliament and its responsibility. She herself says:
“I am interested in setting up a Standing Committee of Parliament for the cross-party consensus, having long-term goals, such as e.g. the restoration of health care, changes in education in the spirit of Finnish, pensions, sustainability and electrical / methane cars fuel.”

Bild/Foto

Björn Leví Gunnarsson is another re-elected MP. He gave great emphasis on equal weighting of votes nationwide. He became a software specialist in educational institutions after he obtained his master’s degree in the United States but he held various jobs, including teaching in elementary school.
“Society expects more responsibility, more information, more cooperation. The system will not be fair unless people become responsible. The system will not be honest unless everyone has access to information. The system will not be human but with more cooperation.”

Bild/Foto

Halldóra Mogensen has been a parliamentary deputy and she has, among others, submitted a resolution on unconditional basic income. A profound sense of justice and a desire to benefit her community have been the dominant driving forces in her life.
“My key issue is about to eliminate poverty and provide equal opportunities for the individual and be truly free. It concerns me to come to the necessary constitutional changes and update our systems in line with the opportunities that technological advances offer”


Reykjavik South (2)
Bild/Foto

Ásta Guðrún Helgadóttir 26 years old is the third re-elected MP for PPIS. In the Parliament, she has undertaken a variety of issues in many fields and made an impact on the ownership of Landsbanki (the Icelandic National bank). Moreover, she has kept track of the copyright for the parliamentary group and has been working closely with pirate MEP Julia Reda. In recent years, she has devoted herself to the work related in one way or another to democracy, freedom of speech and changes in the constitution to reflect the democratic society of the 21st century better. Asta is a historian by training.

Bild/Foto

Gunnar Hrafn Jónsson 35 years has worked as a journalist. He has a BSc in Social Sciences and has lived in UK, Netherlands, China, Germany and Iceland. After moving home in 2006 he was a journalist with the ‘Reykjavik Grapevine‘ and then a reporter on ‘RUV‘ (The Icelandic National Broadcasting Service). He has a 3 year old daughter. As he says, principally he will focus on the rescue of the health care (especially the mental health system), at supplying a new constitution based on the recommendations adopted at the referendum, the participation of Iceland in international cooperation, the educational system.

Southwest (2)
Bild/Foto

Jón Þór Ólafsson Former pirate MP, made headlines when he left the parliament and returned to work with his former job in asphalt. He is married and has two children. During this term of office he got busy (with others) in health care, the EU membership application, fishing quotas and debt issues. He believes it is urgent to create a powerful competitive environment in Iceland, rebuild the health system and improve the part for the elderly and disabled. “I became member of  the Pirates when I realized that the Pirate Party stands for human rights protection and democratic reforms of our time”.

Bild/Foto

Þórhildur Sunna Ævarsdóttir has graduated from the University of Utrecht in international and human rights law. Her focal issues concerns the rights of those who are disadvantaged in society, the adoption of a new constitution and the restoration of health care. She lives in ‘Mosfellsbær’.
“Human rights of minorities and marginalized individuals are my particular areas of interest. In my work I concentrate on the rights of refugees, people with disabilities, prisoners and drug users, along with the rights of people with mental disorders and psychiatric illness”.


Northwest (1)
Bild/Foto

Eva Pandora Baldursdóttir was born in ‘Sauðárkrókur’ in 1990. She has a Bachelor degree in Business Administration from the University of Iceland, completed one year in MA in Cultural Management at the University of ‘Bifrost’ and has an MPA degree in public administration at the University of Iceland. She registered with the Progressive Party from the age of 16, when she started to get interested in politics, but when she met the Pirate Party a few months before the last parliamentary elections she saw immediately that the strategy and values of the Pirates matched hers. Since then, her interest in politics has grown and the issues that remain in focus for her is health, education, housing, corruption, agriculture and equality.

Northeast (1)
Bild/Foto

Einar Aðalsteinn Brynjólfsson has mostly been teaching the last seven years in High School. Einar has worked in various jobs, in fishing, the programming of radio stations, proofreading and guidance.

South (1)
Bild/Foto

Smári McCarthy was the Technical Director of the ‘Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project’ which was involved in the Panama Papers. In recent years he mainly worked in freedom of information and democracy projects. Smári has developed various open source software, including the Wasa2il which was nominated for the Prix Ars Electronica awards in 2013. He writes a lot, among other things, for journals such as “Arc” and “New Internationalist”, but has also written essays for Bergeron’s Children, Mediando la Democracia and The End of Artificial Scarcity.

All images are from piratar.is and the piratar.island facebook page: CC BY-SA

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 Election  Ásta Helgadóttir  Birgitta Jónsdóttir  Bjorn Levi Gunnarson  Einar Brynjolfsson  election  Eva Baldursdottir  Gunnar Hrafn Jonsson  Halldora Morgensen  Iceland  Jon Olafsson  Julia Reda  PPIS  Rick Falkvinge  Smari McCarthy  Torhildur Aevarsdottir
Everything you want to know about Pirate Party Iceland

PirateTimes
 
Everything you want to know about Pirate Party Iceland

Bild/Foto
Pirate Times has followed the progress of Pirate Party Iceland (PPIS) since the foundation of the party. Over the years we have written extensively about PPIS. This article will list links to our coverage of PPIS together with information straight from PPIS and some of the international news stories from the past few days. With these links you can spend a few hours reading up on their history whilst waiting for the results which are predicted to start coming in around midnight European time.

Live-stream to follow the results
www.piratesforiceland.party

#PiratesForIceland on twitter

Pirate Times articles
September 29, 2012 Send A Friend To Ndaa Jail
November 25, 2012 Iceland Has A Pirate Party
November 23, 2012 A Busy Weekend For Pirates On The International Stage
January 5, 2013 Icelandic Authorities Blocking Piratepad As “hate-speech”
February 2, 2013 Iceland’s Pirate Party Leader Plans Risky Trip To Usa
April 10, 2013 Pirate Party Iceland Polling At 7.8% With 17 Days Left Until Elections
April 25, 2013 Report From Iceland #1
April 26, 2013 Report From Iceland #2
April 27, 2013 Iceland Report #3 ; Final Campaigning For A Better Iceland
April 28, 2013 Iceland Report #4 : History Made By A Hair’s Breadth
May 3, 2013 Pirate Times Quiz Iceland Special
May 5, 2013 Iceland Report #5: A Look Back
May 25, 2013 PPI’s New Board Carries Hopes And A Big Weight
June 23, 2013 Ed Snowden’s Bid For Asylum – Live Updates
August 3, 2013 The Game Of Politics : Book Review
August 20, 2013 Icelandic Pirates Found A Youth Wing
August 22, 2013 Iceland’s Parliament Viewer, Keeping Track Of Politicians
September 29, 2013 Solving Democracy Through Technology: Introducing Wasa2il
October 17, 2013 Birgitta Jónsdòttir’s Dream For A Model Iceland
February 3, 2014 Pirates Nominate Chelsea Manning And Edward Snowden For Nobel Peace Prize
May 28, 2014 Icelandic Pirates Prepared To Do Well In Municipal Elections
June 3, 2014 Iceland Election Results A Nail-biting Finish
July 29, 2014 Protesting Parliament Bills In Iceland Is Easy
August 21, 2014 Two Nordic Pirate Parties Change The Hands On The Helm
January 9, 2015 Birgitta Jónsdottir Will Advocate For Freedom Of Internet In Prague
April 20, 2015 Icelandic Pirates: Ppis Vote To Leave Ppi And Birgitta Only Politician To Increase In Trust
May 5, 2015 Show Notes: The Order Of The Pirate Unicorn Podcast 003
May 22, 2015 Show Notes And Podcast: The Order Of The Pirate Unicorn Podcast 005
May 23, 2015 Interview With A German Pirate Living In Iceland
May 27, 2015 Show Notes And Podcast: The Order Of The Pirate Unicorn Podcast 006
June 10, 2015 Show Notes And Podcast: The Order Of The Pirate Unicorn Podcast 008
June 25, 2015 Birgitta’s Jónsdóttir: We, The People, Are The System
July 5, 2015 In A True Democracy Referenda Should Be The Rule Not The Exception
July 20, 2015 The First Ppeu Council Meeting: Moving Right Along
September 2, 2015 Iceland’s Pirates Have A New Steering Committee
October 7, 2015 PPIS Is Largest Party On Iceland For 6th Month
April 4, 2016 Re-elections Looming Close As Iceland Hits A Political Scandal
April 5, 2016 It’s Time For The Pirates
April 6, 2016 The Schrödinger’s Prime Minister Of Iceland
April 6, 2016 Pirate Party Iceland Polling At 43%, Almost A Majority
April 7, 2016 Pirate Party Iceland And Their Path To Popularity
April 8, 2016 Icelandic Status Quo: Out With The Old, In With The Old
April 21, 2016 Icelandic Pirates On The Verge Of Government – Can We Help?
April 25, 2016 A Wind Of Change – Iceland, Brazil, Uk, France, Usa
May 8, 2016 Iceland Pirates Get Loot While Progressive Party Suffers
July 8, 2016 Moving To Iceland For The Pirate Party
July 11, 2016 A Party That Is About To Change Iceland And The World
August 13, 2016 Election Date Set As Icelandic Pirates Hold Primaries
October 27, 2016 Pirate Party On Track For A Record Victory In Iceland
October 27, 2016 Why Icelandic Elections Are More Important Than American

Official Pirate Party Iceland sources
Website
Election Manifest in EnglishFacebookTwitterYoutubeAMA with PPIS, Oct 22nd

Some Recent International News
Pirates poised to take over Iceland Politico.eu
Pirates Take Over Iceland, and the Week’s Other Big News WIRED
Iceland’s Pirate Party could actually win big in the next election Mashable
Iceland’s Pirate Party sails from radical fringe to political contender Washington Post
Will Iceland get a Pirate prime minister? BBC News
Iceland election: Pirate Party looks to make gains BBC News
Can Iceland’s Pirate Party Win the Election? Bloomberg
Iceland’s Pirate party Reuters
Iceland election: polling day arrives with Pirate party looking for gains The Guardian
Iceland, a land of Vikings, braces for a Pirate Party takeover Washington Post
Everything You Need to Know About Iceland’s Pirate Party TIME
Hacker-founded Pirate Party could win Iceland election USA TODAY
The Pirate Party could sail to victory in Iceland, poll shows CBC.ca
Iceland’s Pirate Party aims for new gains on election day Toronto Star
Iceland’s Pirate Party Loves Hackers, Drugs & Revolution Daily Beast
Pirate Party Poised for Power as Icelanders Cast Their Ballots Bloomberg
Iceland’s anti-establishment Pirate Party eyes power in a snap election Daily Mail
Iceland’s Pirate Party Could be On Course to Win Iceland’s Election NBC New York
Pirate party prepares for first major win in Iceland elections New Scientist
Will the radical Pirate Party take over Iceland? Toronto Sun
Iceland’s Pirate Party Could be On Course to Win Iceland’s Election NBCNews.com
A Pirate Party Floats on Europe’s Populist Wave Wall Street Journal
The Pirate Party could form the next Icelandic government VICE News
Iceland’s Pirate Party set to make gains at election International Business Times UK
Iceland’s radical Pirate party senses victory in parliamentary poll euronews
How Hacker and ‘Pirate‘ Birgitta Jónsdóttir Revolutionized Iceland’s Politics Fortune
Pirate parties across the world fail to replicate Iceland success International Business Times UK

Featured image: from piratesforiceland.party

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 Election  Iceland  PPIS
Why Icelandic Elections Are More Important Than American

PirateTimes
 
Why Icelandic Elections Are More Important Than American

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On Saturday, in the shade of the American presidential elections that dominates the daily global news, some more important elections are going to be held. They will take place in the land of ice and snow, the most northern country of Europe, Iceland.

This election is important because in Iceland we don’t have the usual “pretenders” to the power, but a party that symbolizes the fight between the old world that is dying and the new one that is rising. The old is a traditional right-wing, conservative party which gives all power to the politicians. They stand against the radical, which believes in power of the base of the society, the grass root movements, the collective intelligence.

In USA we have the presidential election process with the two parties system, inherently undemocratic, which discourages voters’ participation. A system of “the winner takes it all” that decreases the importance of other political parties. In Iceland no single political party has ever governed the country, because no one has ever received the majority of the votes. All governments have always been coalition governments with the participation of two or more parties. The world’s first female prime minister was elected here in 1980 and in 2009 the first elected openly gay head of government. In short, on one hand we have the perpetuation of a situation and on the other the transition from the old to the new.

Elections in Iceland are more important than the US presidential election because something great is about to happen in Iceland, a change is gonna come for the good of humanity, the evolution of democracy. They are more important for the future of democracy and politics. Impacting civil and human rights, citizens’ participation in decision making processes, transparency, freedom of speech for the individuals and the media, the ratification of the first ever crowd-sourced Constitution. The new world and its values will emerge in Iceland, the old will sink and many other countries will follow.

Collective intelligence VS traditional politics (the silence of the media)
Although politicians supposedly are elected to represent the interests of citizens (of the many) they end up representing alien interests (of the few). They betray peoples’ trust and the recent Panama Papers leak is the greatest evidence. How can we oppose a system to the traditional politics? The answer lies in the collective, participatory democracy, by introducing the involvement of the citizens in decision making; It lies in the collective wisdom and intelligence, that can guarantee a better future.

In fact, a sort of collective intelligence has been practiced in Iceland, by the mobilization of the people and the revision of the country’s new Constitution. It was approved in 2012 in a referendum by more than 2/3 votes, but it still hasn’t been ratified by the parliament.

Passing through very difficult times citizens realized that they have to participate to not let politicians decide their future. The citizens took part both in a physical and a digital manner (the revision of the Constitution was made through the internet and social networks). The awareness of Icelandic citizens came through the crash that the country experienced in 2008.

However, the media (with a few exceptions) has not risen the attention to the recent situation before the elections (polls foreshadow that Pirates will be the winners). The media has also remained silent about a series of events that have taken place in Iceland. More specifically, how the country reacted when the IMF knocked on its door. This is why and how its leadership were forced by the citizens to mobilize in different roads than the traditional channels of reaction.

Thorvaldur Gylfason, professor of Economics at the University of Iceland, is one of 25 representatives in Iceland‘s Constitutional Council (in session from April to July 2011). He was elected by the nation and appointed by parliament to revise Iceland’s constitution and writes the following in opendemocracy.net:
“…Faced by pots- and pans-banging crowds in Parliament Square in Reykjavík in late 2008 and early 2009, the politicians admitted failure, accepting the protesters’ demands for, among other things, a new constitution…”.

There were also a banking debt referenda in 2010. The ‘Icelandic loan guarantees repayment referendum’ was defeated, with 98% voting against and less than 2% in favor and in 2011 it was also rejected by a majority of 60%. The silence of the media of the so called “Icelandic example” made it remain unknown by many.

Greece, the most southern European country, did not follow Iceland’s pathway, instead it accepted IMF. If Greece would have reacted in a parallel way to Iceland then things would surely have been tougher for the elites and better for the Greeks – but it’s never too late.

A swarm of pirates can bring real change
Rick Falkvinge, the founder of the pirate movement, has written a book titled “Swarmwise: The tactical manual to changing the world” that perfectly matches the case of the Icelandic pirate party.

A bunch of pirates (or better “a swarm of pirates”), founded the Pirate party of Iceland on November 2012 and on April 2013 they managed to elect three MPs in the Icelandic parliament. Since then its’ electoral influence was steadily growing. Looking at the polls we can see that Pirates ranked first for more than a year and now they are about to change not only Iceland but the entire world.

The swarm of Icelandic pirates redefines politics with their honesty. This attracts their fellow citizens who are sick and tired of the traditional parties and in search for something new. The “new” is the pirates, described as an anti-system party. Pirate Party Iceland chooses to not have a leader and instead deploying a collective leadership, which introduces direct democracy and espouses the participation of the citizens in deliberative and decision making processes.

Falkvinge, in his interview with Pirate Times, said:
“How a swarm of pirates can redefine politics”, among others commented that pirates are distinguished for their activism: “…It’s just that they’re not identifying as politicians – they’re identifying as activists in opposition to the politicians. What we’re doing is making the leap and bringing our values, the values of the net generation, into politics. In such a way, we are redefining what politicians and politics can be.”

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Pirates: “we can hear you”
Can you hear us now?” is the title of the campaign of the Icelandic Constitution Society (ICS) which aims to send a clear message to the politicians and reminds them who they work for. ICS wrote:
“We are asking voters in Iceland — whether on the right or left — to commit to vote only for parties that have promised to ‘make ratifying a constitution based on the 2012 draft a top priority in the new government.'”

Pirates have already said they will recognize the new Constitution.

Taking into account what has been happening in Iceland since 2008 and looking at the polls you can realize that the time for a change has come. That’s the message Icelanders send to all of us. They reject a political system that has been tested but failed and they do not want to waste any more time with that. They want to experiment with something new, since the mix of the old materials can not bring any different results! In a way, it looks like the Pirate Party in Iceland will come into power very soon.

If the Pirate Party Iceland forms the new government it will affect politics worldwide and surely increase Pirate parties’ influence in other countries. Let’s look at the citizens of Iceland and listen to their message. Especially the American voters should listen and think twice to whom and why they put their trust and vote on, some days later.

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Further links related on the Icelandic Constitution reform:
Articles and videos on canyouhearus.isThe website of the Constitutional CouncilBlueberry Soup: How Iceland changed the way we think about the world” (A film directed by Eileen Jerrett)
The Pirate Party of IcelandThe candidates 2016 of the Icelandic Pirate Party

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 Election  Iceland  Icelandic Constitution Society  IMF  panama papers  PPIS  Rick Falkvinge  Swarmwise  Thorvaldur Gylfason
Pirate Party On Track For A Record Victory In Iceland

PirateTimes
 
Pirate Party On Track For A Record Victory In Iceland

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This is a guest post by Mattias Bjärnemalm, vice-president of Pirate Party Sweden and currently in Iceland for the elections.

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This coming Saturday there will be an election in Iceland, after the Panama scandal forced the Prime Minister to resign and the government to call new elections this summer. It’s impossible, at this point, to say whether the Icelandic Pirate Party will be the largest or second largest party after the election. However, it’s entirely clear that compared to their result of 5.1% in the previous election, this will be an enormous success for them. This will be a large step forward for not just the Icelandic pirates – at the moment of writing, more than thirty pirates from other countries have said that they will travell to Iceland to be there at the election. In that group we can find the leaders for the Swedish, German, Dutch and Slovenian pirate parties, as well as our MEP Julia Reda.

What is it that has made the Icelandic Pirate Party successful? My analysis is that they have succeeded in building upon their previous successes very well. To go from 5% to 20% is an incredible change, but that’s actually not as impressive as the feat of 5.1% in the first election that a party stands in. To understand the Pirates’ success, you have to first understand the circumstances of their election in 2013, half a year after the party’s founding.

This is how ‘The Iceland Blog’ described the situation in 2012:
“Birgitta Jónsdóttir has been elected leader of Píratapartýið. In the Icelandic Pirate’s first policy program there is among other things a call for more transparency in society and increased civil rights. The goal is to get into the Alþingi in the spring elections. The Pirate Party will, above all, be trying to recruit young members who are active on the net. On Saturday the Pirate Party was formally founded at a meeting in Reykjavík. Birgitta Jónsdóttir, who is today an MP for ‘The Movement’, was elected leader of the executive committee. On the committee is also Björn Þór Jóhannesson, Halldóra Mogensen, Jason Scott and Stefán Vignir Skarphéðinsson, as well as Herbert Snorrason and Einar Valur Ingimundarson who were elected by lottery. The goal is to breach the 5% barrier to the Alþingi in April and gain representation in parliament. The Icelandic Pirate Party is aimed mostly towards young and internet-active voters.“

This can be seen as a relatively representative overview of the new party, where the focus was very much on Birgitta. The same blog described their policies in the following way before the election in 2013:
“The Icelandic pirates push classic pirate topics: transparency, freedom of information, direct democracy, public participation and – not necessarily as classic – decriminalization of narcotics. The use of narcotics should, according to the Pirate Party, be handled as a medical and not a legal and judicial problem. They attract mostly young voters from the left. Seen as a bit tougher and not as ‘squeaky clean’ as the Left-Green Movement. The most well-known name in the party is Birgitta Jónsdóttir, who has already had one term in parliament, first as part of ‘Citizen’s Movement’ and then ‘Movement’.“

In short, it’s the fact that they already had an MP from a grassroots movement that is emphasized and that gives the pirates the space they need to succeed at taking themselves over the 5% barrier. With Birgitta’s help they were able to be elected with three MP’s.

The Pirate’s next challenge was to prove that they weren’t just some blip and that they could win elections without celebrity power, which they had a chance to do in the council elections in 2014. There they succeeded, with Halldór Auðar Svansson at the top of the list who was elected into Reykjavík City Council with 5.9%. Through participating in the new municipal government they showed that they were willing to take responsibility in future elections.

Today, the situation is different. The pirates have more candidates with parliamentary experience, and their prime ministerial candidate is Smari McCarthy. He isn’t currently an MP, but Smari was one of the founders of the party and tops one of the lists for a constituency outside Reykjavik (something he also did in the last election when the pirates didn’t reach 5% there). Birgitta remains a central figure in the party and currently proposed as a future speaker of the house for the next parliament. In general, more faces have been brought forward and the pirates are seen as a broad movement in Iceland. After one year of leading the opinion polls, the people of Iceland, and the pirates themselves, have gotten used to the idea that they will probably play a part in the next government.

I don’t think I can emphasize enough how important it would be for the pirate movement globally to have a government with pirate ministers. So it is with great hope that I have packed my bags and booked my journey to Iceland. I flew there for a bit in September to get an idea of who they are and how they work, and I look forward to seeing them again in the coming days. And, of course, there will be a new post here after the election.

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Mattias Bjärnemalm
Vice-president and Net Political spokesperson for Pirate Party Sweden.

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CC-BY, Stefan Rouden

Mattias Bjärnemalm works as an expert in Net Politics in the European Parliament and was previously Head of Cabinet for Amelia Andersdotter’s (ex-MEP) office in Brussels. He is born and raised in Skǻne (southern Sweden) but has also lived and studied in Uppsala, Sweden before moving to Brussels. During his time in Uppsala he founded the Young Pirates Sweden where he was the association Secretary 2006-2009. He was also active in the Pirate Students in Uppsala and sat as a member of the Uppsala University Board 2009-2010.

During his time in Brussels he has worked with several areas within Net Politics such as copyright, net neutrality, data protection, ACTA, IoT and the IANA transition. He is also a frequent visitor to the Internet Governance Forum and EuroDIG.

Mattias was also central in the creation of Young Pirates of Europe and also the European Pirates (where he is currently a board member).

Featured image: CC-BY, Day Donaldson

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 Birgitta Jónsdóttir  Guest Opinion  Election  Herbert Snorrason  Stefán Vignir Skarphéðinsson  Smari McCarthy  PPIS  Halldóra Mogensen  Halldór Auðar Svansson  Jason Scott  Einar Valur Ingimundarson  Björn Þór Jóhannesson
Czech Pirates Gain 5 more Representatives in Regional Election

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Czech Pirates Gain 5 more Representatives in Regional Election

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On 7-8th October there were regional elections in the Czech Republic. The Pirate Party Czech Republic (PPCZ) achieved a successful election in several regions and added five pirate representatives to regional governments. Despite the success PPCZ expressed a concern for a decreasing election participation.
“Even though we were expecting slightly better results in the regional elections, it could have been way worse […] We thank all our voters once again for their support and votes. This election also confirmed the growing trend of the Pirates’ impact, leading to better results in each following election. Mariánské Lázně made us the most happy. In this town, where a Pirate is its mayor, we got unbelievable 30% of the vote. In the second round of the senatorial elections we have our fingers crossed for the two representatives fighting an election with our support.” – Mikuláš Ferjenčík, head of PPCZ Media Department

Compared to the last regional election the Pirate Party has achieved an improvement in every single region of the Czech Republic.  In 2014 PPCZ entered into several local elections. They are now joined by five newly elected pirate representatives from three other regions in the Czech Republic. The greatest success was achieved by the Pirates in the Karlovy Vary region, where three Pirates (Josef Janů, Petr Třešňák and Vojtěch Franta) received a councilor’s seat. PPCZ (in coalition with the Green Party) also received over 5% of the vote in two more regions. In Hradec Králové the pirates received one representative (Martin Jiránek) and in South Moravia region they got another representative (PPCZ deputy chairman, Ivo Vašíček).

During the election the first round of the senate election also took place.  Two Senatorial candidates, supported by the Pirates, advanced to the second round of the elections. Ladislav Kos who runs in the region of ‘Prague 11’ abd Renáta Chmelová who runs in ‘Prague 10, Dubeč and Štěrboholy’. The second (and final) round for the senate election will take place on October 14-15th.

Despite a successful election the President of the Czech Pirate Party (Ivan Bartoš) expressed a concern of decreasing voter participation in elections:
“During every election we can watch a decreasing number of people turning up at the polling stations. It’s a goal for all politicians, not just the Pirates, to reverse this trend. It’s not helpful for the bigger parties to just fight over the rest of voters that actually turn up. All the parties tend to talk about the people’s distrust of politics. Sadly, they don’t do anything to change that, they do not even try. This situation, paradoxically, helps the parties that are actually quite detached from the real function of political parties, which is to represent the real interest of their electorate and transform it into an action while leading the country. If the current development is any sign of what’s to come, any real change for the Czech Republic is impossible.”

You can read more about PPCZ in our earlier articles.

Featured image: No copyright, PPCZ website.

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 Vojt?ch Franta  Renáta Chmelová  PPCZ  Petr T?eš?ák  Mikuláš Ferjen?ík  Martin Jiránek  Ladislav Kos  Josef Jan?  Ivo Vaší?ek  ivan bartos  Election Result  Election
Election Date Set as Icelandic Pirates Hold Primaries

PirateTimes
 
Election Date Set as Icelandic Pirates Hold Primaries

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After much anticipation, the Icelandic coalition partners have announced the date of the early election to be held this autumn as 29 October 2016. The Prime Minister, Sigurður Ingi Jóhannsson, who only assumed the office in April, met with opposition party leaders before making his announcement, who reportedly approved the date. Sigurður did offer the caveat that “Judging by how matters progressed in parliament this spring and summer, we expect that that will happen.”

The coalition government had been reluctant to set a date for the election, as they still had a number of pieces of legislation they wished to pass. As late as 10 August, the agriculture and fishing minister told RÚV Radio: “Let’s make it clear that as soon as we have a set date, that gives the opposition a certain weapon; then it can hold parliament hostage and determine exactly what resolutions will pass in parliament. It can, in fact dictate the schedule with a filibuster or demands. That’s the reason we can’t set the date ahead of time.” He said there were over 50 individual pieces of legislation waiting to be passed.

This means the political campaigning can now enter full swing. The three most recent polls have put the Pirate Party as almost neck and neck with the Independence Party, one of the two current coalition partners. The most recent Gallup poll, from 29 July, put the Pirate Party in second place on 25.3%, and Independence in first with 26.2%. With current polling, a possible result could be a three-way coalition between the Pirate Party, the Left-Green Movement and the Social Democratic Alliance. Support for the other coalition partner, the Progressive Party, has collapsed since Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson resigned as Prime Minister in the wake of the Panama Papers revelations. Another interesting development is the rise of new party Viðreisn, which split from the Independence Party, and may attract votes from Icelanders on the right. It is currently polling around 9%.

Based on the 2013 results, with 25% support the Pirate Party is likely to win just under 20 seats, out of the 63 seats up for election in the parliament. In readiness for the election, the party is holding primaries to select the candidates in each constituency. In the primaries, 17 candidates are hoping to stand in the South Constituency, 24 in the North Constituency, and 102 across the capital’s four constituencies, which adds up to 143 people vying to be Pirate Party candidates in total. Already, the results are in from the primary in the South Constituency, with party co-founder Smári McCarthy topping the list. The primaries in the capital constituencies ends on 12 August, and the primary in the North Constituency ends on 15 August. Within a few months, these people will almost certainly be part of the largest party in the Icelandic parliament, no small achievement.

Editors note: 29 October 2016 is the tentative date set but it’s still not formal. The current government demands that some legislation be passed for the election to happen at that date. Thus, if you book a trip to Iceland – to be part of the historic event – make sure it’s a refundable or changeable flight since the date may still change.

Featured image by Democracy Chronicles, CC-BY 2.0.

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 Election  Iceland  Pirate Party of Iceland  PPIS
Top Candidate for Pirate Party Netherlands Elected

PirateTimes
 
Top Candidate for Pirate Party Netherlands Elected

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The Pirate Party Netherlands (PPNL) elected its top candidate for the national elections that will be held next year (15th of March, 2017). The election for top spot in the coming national elections took place last Sunday, during a general assembly organized specifically for this purpose. Six candidates competed for the top spot in the list: Janmaarten Batstra, Rico Brouwer, Matthijs Pontier, Dirk Poot, Bob Sikkema and Ancilla van de Leest.

To give all Pirates a chance to make an informed decision on whom to elect as the new face of the party, a series of debates were organized throughout the country. During two weeks the cities of Amsterdam, Utrecht, Delft and Groningen were visited. During the third debate, in Delft, Matthijs Pontier retracted his candidacy and expressed his support for Ancilla van de Leest.

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In light of this event it was not a big surprise that Ancilla won the internal election by a landslide victory. Ancilla (30) has been a member of PPNL for years. She is born in Rotterdam and a prominent privacy activist. In the past she has worked for, among others, Bits of Freedom. She is also known from her participation in radio and TV shows.
“With this election I received a mandate to spread the Pirate ideals during the next four years […] I’m very proud to have been given the confidence of the members. The changes in society that are on the Pirate Party agenda have suddenly become very urgent. Even in The Hague. It’s now my job to be the face of a broad movement. With all Pirates together we are going to make sure that civil rights stay guaranteed in a digital society” – Ancilla van de Leest

The Dutch Pirates will use this summer to complete the list and program. After the summer the campaign will begin. Pirates in the whole of the Netherlands will participate in the largest election campaign the party has ever seen.

Images: From PPNL website, CC0

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 Election  Ancilla van de Leest  Bob Sikkema  Dirk Poot  Janmaarten Batstra  Matthijs Pontier  Netherlands  PPNL  Rico Brouwer